• Teton Basin

    Because of the rare plant and wide-ranging animal species that depend upon it, the Teton River Basin has been ranked the number one private lands conservation priority area within the entire Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem for its combination of irreplaceable ecological value and vulnerability.

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  • Teton Basin

    Steeped in agricultural tradition, farming and ranching remains significant in Teton Basin, benefitting both people and wildlife.

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  • South Fork

    The South Fork Snake River corridor from Swan Valley to Menan Buttes is one of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’s most outstanding fish and wildlife resources, including the cottonwood gallery forest along this reach of the river, named the number one wildlife resource in Idaho.

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  • Sand Creek and Middle Henry’s Fork

    Because of the combination of rare plant and animal populations in the area, the Henry’s Fork River is ranked as the number two conservation priority within the entire Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem for its irreplaceable ecological value.

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  • Island Park and Shotgun Valley

    The Island Park Caldera, the Henry’s Lake Flat, Shotgun Valley, and the south slope of the Centennial Range make up a large and diverse landscape, where there are is great value for migratory and wintering elk and sage grouse, raptor migration corridors, and expansive habitats of value to many species.

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Until further notice, all of our staff will be working remotely. Although our office building is closed, we are available by telephone and email. The health and welfare of our staff, family, friends, and community is our top priority. Like you, we are following the CDC guidance. We will continue to update our website as we make decisions about upcoming events so please continue to check back.

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Get to know Kimberly Holmes, our Stewardship Coordinator:

What do you do for the Land Trust?
6 months of the year I travel around eastern Idaho and the west slope of the Tetons visiting with landowners, walking their land and documenting that the conservation values their land protects remain intact. The other 6 months I play desk jockey finding new ways to use technology to make our workflow more efficiently, working on connecting landowners to resources, record keeping, and making maps to promote our mission as often as I’m able to.

What is one of your favorites things about working for the Land Trust?
I work with incredible people with like-minded values in every aspect of the job, from my coworkers to our Board, to our amazing landowners. Learning the history of the land and why our landowners chose to protect it, meeting their families, and hearing about their wildlife sightings each year is truly a favorite part of the job.

What are your hobbies, what do you do for fun?
I enjoy reading about our region and about conservation issues and holistic approaches to conservation. I am also an amateur gardener and a budding birder which has been a challenge for me because I have poor eyesight. I love to go into the parks in both spring and fall to watch wildlife from sun up to sundown. I love to hike, float our rivers, bike around town and I have to make sure I get a good dose of live music as often as possible. I love to dance and feel free.

What inspires you?
Looking at maps of what our organization has accomplished together with the help of our members, donors and landowners gives me chills and moves me to happy tears when I talk about it. My work inspires me and I’m grateful the people I work with feel the same way. You have to want to do this work to really do it right - and it’s been my heart's focus since my second year of college. I couldn’t be more inspired and proud of the work that we do.

What do you never have enough time for?
Probably reading. I always have three or more books in my queue and never get through them fast enough and often need to reread the first part of a book twice before finishing the whole thing.

Thank you Kimberly💚
... See MoreSee Less

Get to know Kimberly Holmes, our Stewardship Coordinator:

What do you do for the Land Trust?
6 months of the year I travel around eastern Idaho and the west slope of the Tetons visiting with landowners, walking their land and documenting that the conservation values their land protects remain intact. The other 6 months I play desk jockey finding new ways to use technology to make our workflow more efficiently, working on connecting landowners to resources, record keeping, and making maps to promote our mission as often as I’m able to. 

What is one of your favorites things about working for the Land Trust? 
I work with incredible people with like-minded values in every aspect of the job, from my coworkers to our Board, to our amazing landowners. Learning the history of the land and why our landowners chose to protect it, meeting their families, and hearing about their wildlife sightings each year is truly a favorite part of the job.

What are your hobbies, what do you do for fun?
I enjoy reading about our region and about conservation issues and holistic approaches to conservation. I am also an amateur gardener and a budding birder which has been a challenge for me because I have poor eyesight. I love to go into the parks in both spring and fall to watch wildlife from sun up to sundown. I love to hike, float our rivers, bike around town and I have to make sure I get a good dose of live music as often as possible. I love to dance and feel free.

What inspires you?
Looking at maps of what our organization has accomplished together with the help of our members, donors and landowners gives me chills and moves me to happy tears when I talk about it. My work inspires me and I’m grateful the people I work with feel the same way. You have to want to do this work to really do it right - and it’s been my hearts focus since my second year of college. I couldn’t be more inspired and proud of the work that we do. 

What do you never have enough time for? 
Probably reading. I always have three or more books in my queue and never get through them fast enough and often need to reread the first part of a book twice before finishing the whole thing.

Thank you Kimberly💚Image attachmentImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

This is without a doubt one of the greatest protectors of our planet! Since a young age she has had a heart for Mother Earth. I am so proud of you Kimberly!!

Idaho, you stole two of Alabama's greatest people from us. Use them well.

You guys are lucky to have such an amazing soul ❤️❤️❤️

Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt." - John Muir

Let's take this wise man's advice and get outside to recharge in nature this holiday weekend. The Teton Regional Land Trust staff and board wish you all a great Memorial Day.

“The mountains are calling and I must go.” - John Muir
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Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt. - John Muir

Lets take this wise mans advice and get outside to recharge in nature this holiday weekend. The Teton Regional Land Trust staff and board wish you all a great Memorial Day. 

“The mountains are calling and I must go.” - John Muir

Species Spotlight - Long-billed Curlew

The Long-billed Curlew is the largest of our region’s shorebirds, and though it is formally classified as a shorebird, in the American West, they are most commonly seen on grasslands during the summer breeding season. Curlews arrive in March and April. Depending on their breeding success, they may stay until July before heading to their wintering grounds in Mexico. Both parents incubate the eggs and a nesting bird may sit motionless on its nest even if approached closely. They also both tend the young and lead them to marshy areas to look for food. The male displays over his nesting territory with spectacular undulating flight, fluttering higher and then gliding lower while giving loud ringing calls. Curlews are easily identified by their long beaks — males can grow up to more than four inches long and females can reach more than seven inches in length. This recognizable bird forages by walking quickly over grassland or mudflats along our rivers, using their long bill to probe for insects just below the surface.

A cool fact about the Long-billed Curlew from American Bird Conservancy's, Jessica Howell: "Long-billed Curlews often nest beside cow pies, and sometimes even nest within cow hoof prints. Researchers think the cow pies provide additional camouflage from predators and may serve as a landmark for parents returning to the nest. Either way, nest success increases with the density of cowpies directly around the nest. The hoof prints are a pre-made depression for laying eggs. This is a really interesting example of the interconnectedness and interdependency of grassland birds and cattle."
... See MoreSee Less

Species Spotlight - Long-billed Curlew 

The Long-billed Curlew is the largest of our region’s shorebirds, and though it is formally classified as a shorebird, in the American West, they are most commonly seen on grasslands during the summer breeding season. Curlews arrive in March and April. Depending on their breeding success, they may stay until July before heading to their wintering grounds in Mexico. Both parents incubate the eggs and a nesting bird may sit motionless on its nest even if approached closely. They also both tend the young and lead them to marshy areas to look for food. The male displays over his nesting territory with spectacular undulating flight, fluttering higher and then gliding lower while giving loud ringing calls. Curlews are easily identified by their long beaks — males can grow up to more than four inches long and females can reach more than seven inches in length. This recognizable bird forages by walking quickly over grassland or mudflats along our rivers, using their long bill to probe for insects just below the surface.

A cool fact about the Long-billed Curlew from American Bird Conservancys, Jessica Howell: Long-billed Curlews often nest beside cow pies, and sometimes even nest within cow hoof prints. Researchers think the cow pies provide additional camouflage from predators and may serve as a landmark for parents returning to the nest. Either way, nest success increases with the density of cowpies directly around the nest. The hoof prints are a pre-made depression for laying eggs. This is a really interesting example of the interconnectedness and interdependency of grassland birds and cattle.
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Latest Teton Regional Land Trust News

Our Conservation Heroes

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Family Conservation on Fox Creek

“Our family has come to love this land. Enamored with its Teton views and spring creeks, we acquired the property in the late 1990s,” Nancy Huntsman shared with us. “In the spring before he passed away in 2012, my husband, Blaine, wrote to his family, ‘the land and its critters have increasingly enticed us with enduring experiences we couldn’t have foreseen when we began our journey.’

Teton Regional Land Trust Seeks Reaccreditation

The land trust accreditation program recognizes land conservation organizations that meet national quality standards for protecting important natural places and working lands forever. The Teton Regional Land Trust is pleased to announce it is applying for re-accreditation. The Teton Regional Land Trust is pleased to announce it is applying for re-accreditation. The public comment period is now open.

Year End Reflections

For the Land Trust, our work has focused for the last 29 years on agreements with landowners who wish to reduce or eliminate subdivision of their land. By focusing on our mission of voluntary land conservation, we have been able to help conserve some of the valley’s treasured assets forever. Working with over 100 landowners, we have conserved over 11,000 acres of land in Teton Valley. Included in this are 20 miles of protected land along the Teton River and its tributaries.

Sandhill Cranes of the Greater Yellowstone

The Greater Yellowstone region is home to the largest intact ecosystem in the lower 48 states of the US. This means that residents and visitors alike have the opportunity to view wildlife regularly and experience all that nature has to offer, including observing iconic species such as the Greater Sandhill Crane, having walked our earth for over 10 million years.

A Treasure Worth Preserving - South Fork Property Conserved

Thanks to the vision of landowner, Al Davis, another stretch of the South Fork is forever protected. The Teton Regional Land Trust (TRLT) recently completed this conservation easement that builds on decades of conservation along the South Fork.

Inspiring you to Protect Great Places

Conserving working farms and ranches, fish and wildlife habitat, and scenic open spaces in Eastern Idaho for this and future generations.