• The Start of a Movement

    And the work has just begun. It was back in 1989 that the idea of a Land Trust in Teton Valley was born. Early discussions by Michael Whitfield, a multigenerational resident, and others reflected a growing concern about the increasing development in Teton Valley and the effect these changes were having on wildlife and ranching.

  • Teton Basin

    Because of the rare plant and wide-ranging animal species that depend upon it, the Teton River Basin has been ranked the number one private lands conservation priority area within the entire Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem for its combination of irreplaceable ecological value and vulnerability.

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  • Teton Basin

    Steeped in agricultural tradition, farming and ranching remains significant in Teton Basin, benefitting both people and wildlife.

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  • South Fork

    The South Fork Snake River corridor from Swan Valley to Menan Buttes is one of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’s most outstanding fish and wildlife resources, including the cottonwood gallery forest along this reach of the river, named the number one wildlife resource in Idaho.

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  • Sand Creek and Middle Henry’s Fork

    Because of the combination of rare plant and animal populations in the area, the Henry’s Fork River is ranked as the number two conservation priority within the entire Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem for its irreplaceable ecological value.

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  • Island Park and Shotgun Valley

    The Island Park Caldera, the Henry’s Lake Flat, Shotgun Valley, and the south slope of the Centennial Range make up a large and diverse landscape, where there are is great value for migratory and wintering elk and sage grouse, raptor migration corridors, and expansive habitats of value to many species.

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We are remembering a special member of our Land Trust family today on the 10th Anniversary of Wray Landon IV's passing💚

"Everyday Wray" was a well-deserved nickname as he lived by the mantra that he had to get out into the mountains at least once every day. Wray was passionate about the outdoors and conservation in eastern Idaho. As a member of the Land Trust's stewardship staff, he had the opportunity to get outdoors and protect the land he loved.

Projects he worked on included preserving the view from the Teton River overlook at Harrops Bridge, Pine Creek Bench, and properties in the Texas Slough area that are now part of a
2,500-acre complex of protected land along the lower Henry’s Fork. After working in the field on projects like these, he ran, and sometimes that meant up the Grand Teton...in time for the sunset!
... See MoreSee Less

We are remembering a special member of our Land Trust family today on the 10th Anniversary of Wray Landon IVs passing💚

Everyday Wray was a well-deserved nickname as he lived by the mantra that he had to get out into the mountains at least once every day. Wray was passionate about the outdoors and conservation in eastern Idaho. As a member of the Land Trusts stewardship staff, he had the opportunity to get outdoors and protect the land he loved. 
 
Projects he worked on included preserving the view from the Teton River overlook at Harrops Bridge, Pine Creek Bench, and properties in the Texas Slough area that are now part of a
2,500-acre complex of protected land along the lower Henry’s Fork.  After working in the field on projects like these, he ran, and sometimes that meant up the Grand Teton...in time for the sunset!Image attachmentImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

Thanks for sharing. Thinking today of Wray’s family— both his real family and his land trust family. Hard to believe it’s been 10 years. ❤️

I wish I’d had the opportunity to know him.

3rd Annual Crane Festival Poster Contest
April 20th Deadline

The Greater Yellowstone Crane Festival is held to celebrate Sandhill Cranes and all the incredible wildlife in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. This year’s festival will be in Teton Valley on September 14-19. We are seeking artists to submit original artwork or poster designs for the annual poster design contest. The winning design will be the official poster for the 3rd annual festival and will be used on advertising, banners, and merchandise. Check out our website for more information and the contest guidelines: tetonlandtrust.org/event/3rd-annual-greater-yellowstone-crane-festival/

Last year's winning artwork by Helen Seay.
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3rd Annual Crane Festival Poster Contest 
April 20th Deadline

The Greater Yellowstone Crane Festival is held to celebrate Sandhill Cranes and all the incredible wildlife in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. This year’s festival will be in Teton Valley on September 14-19. We are seeking artists to submit original artwork or poster designs for the annual poster design contest. The winning design will be the official poster for the 3rd annual festival and will be used on advertising, banners, and merchandise. Check out our website for more information and the contest guidelines: https://tetonlandtrust.org/event/3rd-annual-greater-yellowstone-crane-festival/

Last years winning artwork by Helen Seay.

The count has begun!
Join in February 14-17, 2020
gbbc.birdcount.org/
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The count has begun!
Join in February 14-17, 2020
https://gbbc.birdcount.org/
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Latest Teton Regional Land Trust News

Teton Regional Land Trust Seeks Reaccreditation

The land trust accreditation program recognizes land conservation organizations that meet national quality standards for protecting important natural places and working lands forever. The Teton Regional Land Trust is pleased to announce it is applying for re-accreditation. The Teton Regional Land Trust is pleased to announce it is applying for re-accreditation. The public comment period is now open.

Year End Reflections

For the Land Trust, our work has focused for the last 29 years on agreements with landowners who wish to reduce or eliminate subdivision of their land. By focusing on our mission of voluntary land conservation, we have been able to help conserve some of the valley’s treasured assets forever. Working with over 100 landowners, we have conserved over 11,000 acres of land in Teton Valley. Included in this are 20 miles of protected land along the Teton River and its tributaries.

Sandhill Cranes of the Greater Yellowstone

The Greater Yellowstone region is home to the largest intact ecosystem in the lower 48 states of the US. This means that residents and visitors alike have the opportunity to view wildlife regularly and experience all that nature has to offer, including observing iconic species such as the Greater Sandhill Crane, having walked our earth for over 10 million years.

A Treasure Worth Preserving - South Fork Property Conserved

Thanks to the vision of landowner, Al Davis, another stretch of the South Fork is forever protected. The Teton Regional Land Trust (TRLT) recently completed this conservation easement that builds on decades of conservation along the South Fork.

Celebrating 10 Years of “Wrunning for Wray” and Honoring His Legacy through Conservation

Join the Teton Regional Land Trust on Saturday, June 22 at Grand Targhee Resort for the 10th Annual Wrun for Wray Targhee Hill Climb held in honor of Wray Landon IV.

2nd Annual Greater Yellowstone Crane Festival Poster Design Contest

The Greater Yellowstone Crane Festival is held to celebrate the annual migration of Sandhill Cranes through Teton Valley. This year’s festival will be on September 16-21.

Inspiring you to Protect Great Places

Conserving working farms and ranches, fish and wildlife habitat, and scenic open spaces in Eastern Idaho for this and future generations.