• Teton Basin

    Because of the rare plant and wide-ranging animal species that depend upon it, the Teton River Basin has been ranked the number one private lands conservation priority area within the entire Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem for its combination of irreplaceable ecological value and vulnerability.

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  • Teton Basin

    Steeped in agricultural tradition, farming and ranching remains significant in Teton Basin, benefitting both people and wildlife.

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  • South Fork

    The South Fork Snake River corridor from Swan Valley to Menan Buttes is one of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’s most outstanding fish and wildlife resources, including the cottonwood gallery forest along this reach of the river, named the number one wildlife resource in Idaho.

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  • Sand Creek and Middle Henry’s Fork

    Because of the combination of rare plant and animal populations in the area, the Henry’s Fork River is ranked as the number two conservation priority within the entire Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem for its irreplaceable ecological value.

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  • Island Park and Shotgun Valley

    The Island Park Caldera, the Henry’s Lake Flat, Shotgun Valley, and the south slope of the Centennial Range make up a large and diverse landscape, where there are is great value for migratory and wintering elk and sage grouse, raptor migration corridors, and expansive habitats of value to many species.

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Teton Regional Land Trust Names Kim Trotter as Executive Director

Eastern Idaho native and conservation leader Kim Trotter has been appointed Executive Director of Teton Regional Land Trust, whose mission is to conserve working farms and ranches, fish and wildlife habitat, and scenic open spaces in eastern Idaho for this and future generations.

For nearly three decades, Trotter has dedicated her career to conserving agricultural lands, fish and wildlife habitat, and sustainable communities in the Northern Rockies. Her extensive background includes biodiversity conservation, environmental policy, wildlife and large landscape ecology, land and water transactions, and ecological connectivity and restoration.

Trotter’s passion for protecting the area’s natural and agricultural resources dates back to her early career experience negotiating many of eastern Idaho’s early conservation easements as a Land Protection Specialist with Teton Regional Land Trust. This included safeguarding miles of habitat along the Henry’s Fork of the Snake River and procuring Idaho’s first Farm and Ranchland Protection Program grant to work with private landowners in the Sand Creek wildlife corridor.

“Twenty-three years ago, Kim started with the Land Trust as an intern and then continued as a Land Protection Specialist,” said Arantza Zabala, President of the Teton Regional Land Trust Board of Directors. “We are so excited to have one of our own come back to lead the organization.”

Trotter’s recent experience includes serving as U.S. Program Director for the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Y2Y), where she led collaborative efforts to reconnect wildlife habitat through large landscape conservation. These projects included building wildlife-friendly roads and fences, increasing access to human-wildlife conflict reduction tools and programs, safeguarding key private lands, and ensuring the long-term protection of public lands.

Previously, she was Executive Director of the Community Foundation of Teton Valley, providing financial and strategic support to more than 50 local nonprofit organizations. She has also served as the Director of Trout Unlimited’s Idaho Water Project, working with landowners, water users, and state and federal agencies to promote protection and restoration of Idaho’s native and wild fisheries. During her tenure, she was appointed by Governor Otter to represent fish and wildlife interests on a committee tasked to resolve water shortages associated with the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer in southern Idaho.

“The work of the Teton Regional Land Trust is essential in order to preserve the natural landscapes and agricultural character of our communities in eastern Idaho,” Trotter said. “The mission has always been dear to me, and I’m excited to continue to strategically protect this unique ecosystem and lead the Land Trust forward.”

Trotter has presented regionally and internationally on wildlife and large landscape conservation, endangered species protection and recovery, and conservation partnerships. In 2019, she co-authored a chapter on the environmental politics and policy of Western public lands. Through her work to restore bull trout in central Idaho, she received the Forest Service’s most prestigious acknowledgement for partnership, the “Rise to the Future” award. For the last nine years, she served as a volunteer board member with the Idaho Conservation League. And in August, she and her family completed a year-long journey around the US and western Canada.

Trotter received her Master of Environmental Management in resource ecology from Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment and her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Puget Sound.

She assumed her responsibilities as Executive Director of Teton Regional Land Trust on September 22, 2022.

Since 1990, Teton Regional Land Trust has worked with hundreds of conservation organizations and landowners to protect nearly 40,000 acres of critical wildlife habitat and working lands in eastern Idaho, including migration corridors for large mammals, native Yellowstone cutthroat trout spawning areas and tributaries, wetlands and critical bird habitat, and agricultural lands. For more information, visit www.tetonlandtrust.org.
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Teton Regional Land Trust Names Kim Trotter as Executive Director

Eastern Idaho native and conservation leader Kim Trotter has been appointed Executive Director of Teton Regional Land Trust, whose mission is to conserve working farms and ranches, fish and wildlife habitat, and scenic open spaces in eastern Idaho for this and future generations. 

For nearly three decades, Trotter has dedicated her career to conserving agricultural lands, fish and wildlife habitat, and sustainable communities in the Northern Rockies.  Her extensive background includes biodiversity conservation, environmental policy, wildlife and large landscape ecology, land and water transactions, and ecological connectivity and restoration. 

Trotter’s passion for protecting the area’s natural and agricultural resources dates back to her early career experience negotiating many of eastern Idaho’s early conservation easements as a Land Protection Specialist with Teton Regional Land Trust. This included safeguarding miles of habitat along the Henry’s Fork of the Snake River and procuring Idaho’s first Farm and Ranchland Protection Program grant to work with private landowners in the Sand Creek wildlife corridor.  

“Twenty-three years ago, Kim started with the Land Trust as an intern and then continued as a Land Protection Specialist,” said Arantza Zabala, President of the Teton Regional Land Trust Board of Directors. “We are so excited to have one of our own come back to lead the organization.”

Trotter’s recent experience includes serving as U.S. Program Director for the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Y2Y), where she led collaborative efforts to reconnect wildlife habitat through large landscape conservation. These projects included building wildlife-friendly roads and fences, increasing access to human-wildlife conflict reduction tools and programs, safeguarding key private lands, and ensuring the long-term protection of public lands.   

Previously, she was Executive Director of the Community Foundation of Teton Valley, providing financial and strategic support to more than 50 local nonprofit organizations.  She has also served as the Director of Trout Unlimited’s Idaho Water Project, working with landowners, water users, and state and federal agencies to promote protection and restoration of Idaho’s native and wild fisheries. During her tenure, she was appointed by Governor Otter to represent fish and wildlife interests on a committee tasked to resolve water shortages associated with the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer in southern Idaho.  

“The work of the Teton Regional Land Trust is essential in order to preserve the natural landscapes and agricultural character of our communities in eastern Idaho,” Trotter said. “The mission has always been dear to me, and I’m excited to continue to strategically protect this unique ecosystem and lead the Land Trust forward.”

Trotter has presented regionally and internationally on wildlife and large landscape conservation, endangered species protection and recovery, and conservation partnerships.  In 2019, she co-authored a chapter on the environmental politics and policy of Western public lands.  Through her work to restore bull trout in central Idaho, she received the Forest Service’s most prestigious acknowledgement for partnership, the “Rise to the Future” award.  For the last nine years, she served as a volunteer board member with the Idaho Conservation League.  And in August, she and her family completed a year-long journey around the US and western Canada.

Trotter received her Master of Environmental Management in resource ecology from Duke Universitys Nicholas School of the Environment and her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Puget Sound.

She assumed her responsibilities as Executive Director of Teton Regional Land Trust on September 22, 2022.

Since 1990, Teton Regional Land Trust has worked with hundreds of conservation organizations and landowners to protect nearly 40,000 acres of critical wildlife habitat and working lands in eastern Idaho, including migration corridors for large mammals, native Yellowstone cutthroat trout spawning areas and tributaries, wetlands and critical bird habitat, and agricultural lands. For more information, visit www.tetonlandtrust.org.

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Wow Kim! I didn't know you were such a heavy hitter. The community is very fortunate to have you leading conservation efforts that are so near and dear to a lot of us. Congratulations.

Eek! This is OUTSTANDING! Kim is AMAZING! Go TRLT!

Our valley is blessed to have you at the helm of TRLT!

Kim. That is amazing! You will be SO SO food at that job. Congratulations!

Amazing! Look at you do the most amazing family adventure and roll straight into this!

Terrific news! Very happy about this.

Nice! Now I can tell people I knew you when you just played in small, grungy clubs and bars.

Great fit! Congrats Kim!

Woo hoo! Congratulations! Well deserved. 💥💥

Kim, I'm so happy for you! Congratulations! 🎉

Congratulations!!

Go girl! Proud of you ALWAYS!

Welcome back!

Yay Kim Goodman Trotter!!!!

What fantastic news!!! Congrats, Kim!

The land trust is in great hands. Congrats Kim Goodman Trotter!

Fantastic.

Great news! Congratulations 👏

Congratulations Kim

Kim is just the very best !

Yea!!! Awesome!

You'll do a great job

Congratulations, TRLT and Kim🎇🎆💜🎉💫

Congratulations Kim! Well deserved.

Awesome Kim!!! Great choice!

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The Crane Festival may be over, but nobody told the Sandhill cranes! They're still making use of Teton Valley, fueling up before their migration south. Teton Valley hosts the largest population of staging Sandhill cranes in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, which is why the effort to protect their habitat is crucial. That's why Teton Regional Land Trust developed the Greater Yellowstone Sandhill Crane Initiative, which is designed to secure and actively manage premigration staging habitat in Teton Valley. One of the ways that's accomplished is through Grain for Cranes, a project which allows donors to fund acres of farmland specifically for the cranes. Barley is grown, cut, and left for the cranes to enjoy. The second picture shows one of the food plots being cut earlier this month. Thanks to the donors and farmers who make this possible! For more information on the Greater Yellowstone Sandhill Crane Initiative, click here: tetonlandtrust.org/engage/greater-yellowstone-sandhill-crane-initiative/ ... See MoreSee Less

The Crane Festival may be over, but nobody told the Sandhill cranes! Theyre still making use of Teton Valley, fueling up before their migration south. Teton Valley hosts the largest population of staging Sandhill cranes in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, which is why the effort to protect their habitat is crucial. Thats why Teton Regional Land Trust developed the Greater Yellowstone Sandhill Crane Initiative, which is designed to secure and actively manage premigration staging habitat in Teton Valley. One of the ways thats accomplished is through Grain for Cranes, a project which allows donors to fund acres of farmland specifically for the cranes. Barley is grown, cut, and left for the cranes to enjoy. The second picture shows one of the food plots being cut earlier this month. Thanks to the donors and farmers who make this possible! For more information on the Greater Yellowstone Sandhill Crane Initiative, click here: https://tetonlandtrust.org/engage/greater-yellowstone-sandhill-crane-initiative/Image attachment

Tonight! Swing by Idaho Brewing Company in Idaho Falls for a pint, enjoy music by The Wild Potatoes and support the Land Trust! We'll be there from 5:00-8:00.

We're coming prepared with some great raffle items like gift baskets, artwork, and even a certificate for a guided river float, so be sure to stop by our table and enter to win! See you there!

Check out The Wild Potatoes' music at this link: The Wild Potatoes; River Concert 2020
... See MoreSee Less

Tonight! Swing by Idaho Brewing Company in Idaho Falls for a pint, enjoy music by The Wild Potatoes and support the Land Trust! Well be there from 5:00-8:00. 

Were coming prepared with some great raffle items like gift baskets, artwork, and even a certificate for a guided river float, so be sure to stop by our table and enter to win! See you there!

Check out The Wild Potatoes music at this link: https://www.facebook.com/TheWildPotatoes/videos/5572658659493756
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Conserving working farms and ranches, fish and wildlife habitat, and scenic open spaces in Eastern Idaho for this and future generations.